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Herp Bibliography Page

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1 8886 Andreadis, P. 2008. Seasonality syndrome and proliferating pythons. Abstract in Joint Meeting of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, 23–28 July 2008, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
2 9366 Andreadis, P. T. 2011. Python molurus bivittatus (Burmese python). Reproducing populations. Herpetological Review 42:302−303.
3 7595 Anonymous. 2005. Reptile news and trivia: beagle sniffs out snakes in the Everglades. Reptiles Magazine 13(11):8.
4 7237 Anonymous. 2005. Reptile news and trivia: feral burms a concern. Reptiles Magazine 13(4):9.
5 8678 Anonymous. 2008. News & notes: could Burmese pythons be moving into your neighborhood? Florida Wildlife 61(3):16.
6 8937 Anonymous. 2008. Studies on Burmese python in U.S. conflict. Reptiles Magazine 16(12):16.
7 8857 Arment, C. 2008. Boss snakes: stories and sightings of giant snakes in North America. Coachwhip Publications, Landisville, Pennsylvania, USA. 392pp.
8 9191 Avery, M. L., R. M. Engeman, K. L. Keacher, J. S. Humphrey, W. E. Bruce, T. C. Mathies, and R. E. Mauldin. 2010. Cold weather and the potential range of invasive Burmese pythons. Biological Invasions 12:3649–3652.
9 8619 Barker, D. G., and T. M. Barker. 2008. Comments on a flawed herpetological paper and an improper and damaging news release from a government agency. Bulletin of the Chicago Herpetological Society 43:45–47.
10 9192 Barker, D. G., and T. M. Barker. 2010. A flawed USGS report on giant constrictors. Bulletin of the Chicago Herpetological Society 45:25–28.
11 9673 Barker, D. G., and T. M. Barker. 2010. A review of: Dorcas, M. E., J. D. Willson and J. W. Gibbons. 2010. Can Invasive Burmese Pythons Inhabit temperate regions of the southeastern United States? Biological Invasions. Bulletin of the Chicago Herpetological Society 45:187–189.
12 9193 Barker, D. G., and T. M. Barker. 2010. Review: giant constrictors: biology and management profiles and an establishment risk assessment for nine large species of pythons, anacondas, and the boa constrictor by Robert Reed and Gordon Rodda. Bulletin of the Chicago Herpetological Society 45:10–17.
13 9372 Barker, D. G., and T. M. Barker. 2011. A review of: Willson, J. D., M. E. Dorcas and R. W. Snow. 2010. Identifying plausible scenarios for the establishment of invasive Burmese pythons (Python molurus) in southern Florida. Biological Invasions. Bulletin of the Chicago Herpetological Society 46:41−43.
14 9670 Barker, D. G., annd T. M. Barker. 2012. A discussion of two methods of modeling suitable climate for the Burmese python, Python bivittatus, with comments on Rodda, Jarnevich and Reed (2011). Bulletin of the Chicago Herpetological Society 47:69–76.
15 9024 Bilger, B. 2009. The natural world: swamp things. The New Yorker (April 20):80–89.
16 7801 Biondi, J. 2006. Make way for pythons: former pets are colonizing the Everglades. Florida InsideOut (March/April):140, 142, 144.
17 1222 Burdick, A. 1995. Attack of the aliens: Florida tangles with invasive species. Reptile Hobbyist 1(2):30–35.
18 8669 Collins, T. M., B. Freeman, and S. Snow. 2008. Final report. Genetic characterization of populations of the nonindigenous Burmese python in Everglades National Park. Prepared for the South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, Florida, USA. 30pp.
19 9489 Dorcas, M. E., and J. D. Willson. 2011. Invasive pythons in the United States: ecology of an introduced predator. University of Georgia Press, Athens, Georgia, USA. 156pp.
20 9262 Dorcas, M. E., J. D. Willson, and J. W. Gibbons. 2011. Can invasive Burmese Pythons inhabit temperate regions of the southeastern United States? Biological Invasions 13:793–802.
21 9557 Dorcas, M. E., J. D. Willson, R. N. Reed, R. W. Snow, M. R. Rochford, M. A. Miller, W. E. Meshaka, Jr., P. T. Andreadis, F. J. Mazzotti, C. M. Romagosa, and K. M. Hart. 2012. Severe mammal declines coincide with proliferation of invasive Burmese pythons in Everglades National Park. PNAS 109:2418−2422.
22 9371 Engeman, R., E. Jacobson, M. L. Avery, and W. E. Meshaka, Jr. 2011. The aggressive invasion of exotic reptiles in Florida with a focus on prominent species: a review. Current Zoology 57:599–612.
23 7240 Farrell, C. 2005. The river of grass. Reptiles Magazine 13(4):58–65.
24 7271 Ferriter, A. 2005. Snakes, snakes, and puppy dog tails: Lygodium with teeth. Wildland Weeds 8(2):6.
25 7816 Ferriter, A., B. Doren, C. Goodyear, D. Thayer, D. Burch, L. Toth, M. Bodle, J. Lane, D. Schmitz, P. Pratt, S. Snow, and K. Langeland. 2006. Chapter 9: the status of nonindigenous species in the South Florida environment. Pages 9-1–9-102 in 2006 South Florida Environmental Report – Volume I, The South Florida Environment. South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, Florida, USA.
26 8481 Greene, D. U., J. M. Potts, J. G. Duquesnel, and R. W. Snow. 2007. Geographic distribution: Python molurus bivittatus (Burmese python). Herpetological Review 38:355.
27 10815 Hanslowe, E. B., J. G. Duquesnel, R. W. Snow, B. G. Falk, A. A. Y. Adams, E. F. Metzger III, M. A. Collier, and R. N. Reed. 2018. Exotic predators may threaten another island ecosystem: a comprehensive assessment of python and boa reports from the Florida Keys. Management 9:369–377.
28 9127 Hardin, S. 2007. Managing non-native wildlife in Florida: state perspective, policy and practice. Pages 43–52 in G. W. Wilmer, W. C. Pitt, and K. A. Fagerstone, editors. Managing vertebrate invasive species: proceedings of an international symposium. USDA/APHIS/WS, National Wildlife Research Center, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA.
29 8684 Harvey, R. G., M. L. Brien, M. S. Cherkiss, M. Dorcas, M. Rochford, R. W. Snow, and F. J. Mazzotti. 2008. Burmese pythons in South Florida: scientific support for invasive species management. University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, IFAS Publication Number WEC-242. 8pp.
30 9136 Jordan, P. 2009. The great South Florida python scare. Playboy 56(11):124–126, 145–149.
31 10730 Krysko, K. L., R. N. Reed, M. R. Rochford, L. Nunez, and K. M. Enge. 2019. Python bivittatus Kuhl 1820, Burmese python. Pages 454–458 in K. L. Krysko, K. M. Enge, and P. E. Moler, editors. Amphibians and reptiles of Florida. University of Florida Press, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
32 9477 Meshaka, W. E., Jr. 2011. A runaway train in the making: the exotic amphibians, reptiles, turtles, and crocodilians of Florida. Monograph 1. Herpetological Conservation and Biology 6:1−101.
33 6947 Meshaka, W. E., Jr., B. P. Butterfield, and J. B. Hauge. 2004. The exotic amphibians and reptiles of Florida. Krieger, Melbourne, Florida, USA. 166pp.
34 4260 Meshaka, W. E., Jr., W. F. Loftus, and T. Steiner. 2000. The herpetofauna of Everglades National Park. Florida Scientist 63:84–103.
35 6664 Morgan, C. 2003. US invasion: Everglades pythons. Journal of Kansas Herpetology No. 5:7–8.
36 10474 Mutascio, H. E., S. E. Pittman, P. A. Zollner, and L. E. D’Acunto. 2018. Modeling relative habitat suitability of southern Florida for invasive Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus). Landscape Ecology 33:257−274.
37 7440 Oberhofer, L., and R. W. Snow. 2005. Disposable pets, unwanted giants: pythons in Everglades National Park. Abstract in Joint Meeting of the 21st Annual Meeting of the American Elasmobranch Society, 85th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, 63rd Annual Meeting of the Herpetologists' League, and the 48th Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles; 6–11 July 2005, Tampa, Florida, USA.
38 7953 Ogden, J. C., S. M. Davis, T. K. Barnes, K. J. Jacobs, and J. H. Gentile. 2005. Total system conceptual ecological model. Wetlands 25:955–979.
39 9840 Perez, L. 2012. Snake in the grass: an Everglades invasion. Pineapple Press, Sarasota, Florida, USA. 200pp.
40 8854 Pyron, R. A., F. T. Burbrink, and T. J. Guiher. 2008. Claims of potential expansion throughout the U.S. by invasive python species are contradicted by ecological niche models. PLoS ONE 3(8):1–7.
41 9072 Reed, R. N., and G. H. Rodda. 2009. Giant constrictors: biological and management profiles and an establishment risk assessment for nine large species of pythons, anacondas, and the boa constrictor. U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2009–1202. 302pp.
42 9697 Reed, R. N., J. D. Willson, G. H. Rodda, and M. E. Dorcas. 2012. Ecological correlates of invasion impact for Burmese pythons in Florida. Integrative Zoology 7:254–270.
43 9126 Rodda, G. H., C. S. Jarnevich, and R. N. Reed. 2009. What parts of the US mainland are climatically suitable for invasive alien pythons spreading from Everglades National Park? Biological Invasions 11:241–252.
44 7869 Satter, I. 2006. Seeing is believing on SR 70. tnews (Florida Department of Transportation newsletter) 37(3):4.
45 8391 Snow, R. W., K. L. Krysko, K. M. Enge, L. Oberhofer, A. Warren-Bradley, and L. Wilkins. 2007. Introduced populations of Boa constrictor (Boidae) and Python molurus bivittatus (Pyhtonidae) in southern Florida. Pages 416-438 in R. W. Henderson and R. Powell, editors. Biology of the boas and pythons. Eagle Mountain Publishing, Eagle Mountain, Utah, USA.
46 9195 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2010. Draft environmental assessment for listing nine large constrictor snakes as injurious wildlife under the Lacey Act. South Florida Ecological Services Office, Vero Beach, Florida, USA. 47pp.
47 9330 Willson, J. D., M. E. Dorcas, and R. W. Snow. 2010. Identifying plausible scenarios for the establishment of invasive Burmese pythons (Python molurus) in southern Florida. Biological Invasions 13:1493−1504.
48 10443 Willson, J. D., M. E. Dorcas, and R. W. Snow. 2011. Identifying plausible scenarios for the establishment of invasive Burmese pythons (Python molurus) in southern Florida. Biological Invasions 13:1493−1504.

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